Dogs » Hysterectomy in 4 yr old shih Tzu.

Doggy1987

This question is related to: Rosie the Dog

Age:4
Gender:Female
Breed:Shih tzu
Neutered:Yes
Weight:7kg

Hysterectomy in 4 yr old shih Tzu.

Our dog went to the vet in December as we had found a lump on her breast area. The vet did a test that came back as a carcinoma so wanted to remove it. While she was under we asked the vet to spay her. She had always had what we believed were silent heats.

When doing the spay the vet found that she had a bulb like mass on the tube that directly connects to the two ovaries and then goes down towards the vulva(sorry I am not sure what its correct name would be)
Once removed he decided to open it up to see what was inside and it had a thick black discharge in it over 330mls worth. The vet gave us pictures which I cant upload but can email if you are interested. He said in all his 25years as a vet he has never seen anything like this.

She had the surgery and the lump removal and a mammary tract removed and will be having another mamamry tract removed soon as a precaution to the cancer returning.

This last week she has been constipated so we took her to the vet on 11th Jan and he gave her an internal and said he can feel a mass which is blocking her bowel movements and he is really puzzled as what it is. He has asked us to bring her back in today 12th Jan and he is going to open her up again.

Just wanted to know if anything like this has ever been heard of as the vet and his colleagues are saying they haven't ever heard of it

3 days ago

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Doggy1987

See my profile picture of her ovaries for the mass he found.

3 days ago

Martina Stuart

Was the ovarian mass sent for analysis and if so what was the result?
Each ovary is connected to the uterus by a Fallopian tube. These are the only structures through which the ovaries connect with each other.
Mammary carcinomas are common in the bitch and although they are a malignant tumours that often spread (netastasise) to the lymph nodes and lungs they rarely spread to to the ovaries Fallopian tubes ovaries or uterus.
Separate unrelated cysts and tumours of these organs can and do develop. These may be benign or malignant which is why analysis is important.
I suggest that you put your trust in the vet to determine the level of recurrence or spread within the abdomen to advise you accordingly of the right course of action during surgery today.
Good luck to you all

3 days ago

Doggy1987

We just heard back from our vet. He took an X-ray of our dog and also used a catheter to test the bladder wasn’t affected by this unknown mass. The bladder is currently fine but he did determine that the mass of affecting her bowel movements (which we already knew). They gave her an enema and cleared her out but decided not to go ahead with the operation due to the unknown nature of the mass and the worry that more scar tissue could create further problems in her abdomen and potentially lead to urinary issues. A small tissue sample was take from the mass to be tested but as of today we still have no idea what this is. Her case is now being referred to a diplomate. We will have to give her enemas for the time being until her case is looked at and a treatment plan can be created.

3 days ago

Martina Stuart

Call me old fashioned which I know I am but my approach would be exploratory laparotomy ie open her up and have a look and hope I could remove it and improve her situation. If I could then do it there and then and if not then put her to sleep whilst she was under the anaesthetic m. The boost taken will help determine the decision at that stage.

Also call me old and tired ! I posted this in the wrong question!
I apologise for the connsequent delay in responding!
How is she ?

2 days ago

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