Dogs » Possible arthritis - NSAID's and steroids caused problems

Meg

This question is related to: Jessie the Dog

Age:6 years
Gender:Female
Breed:Bordie Collie
Neutered:Yes
Weight:24kg
Vaccination History:Every 2 years - due this month
Fed On:Cooked meat/potato/carrot and fish oil
Kept:House pet

Possible arthritis - NSAID's and steroids caused problems

My six year old Border Collie has recently developed mild stiffness on getting up but no other obvious signs of pain/distress. Our vet prescribed Previcox which caused her extreme gut pain and diarrhea, then steroids which caused her to wet herself. Both drugs helped with the stiffness, though.

When I asked what else we can do - we try to walk her gently and rest her, keep her off cold surfaces and rub her back legs - the vet said X-rays and an MRI would be the next stage. Cost approx £2000 - which we do not have. What might this show? Vet was very vague in his answer.

Can anyone give advice about where to go from here with a young, fit, daft Collie who has had no injuries or accidents and has no pet insurance. I don't like the idea of steroids and the dog's distress after four days of Previcox was dreadful. Any help very gratefully received.

Thank you.

22/3/18

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Chicco

First of all I would say that you need a diagnosis, however the usual first steps would be NSAID's for a couple of weeks first. However, obviously previcox isn't the only one but you sound like you were lucky to catch this when you did and personally I'd be wary of NSAID's again too.

However, do feel it was extreme to put her on steroids as yet as I tend to think of those as for extreme circumstances or end of life care.

Why not go natural for a while and consider something like 'Golden Paste' (google it) it is turmeric based. You can also get other more natural products like yumove and even hydrotherapy.

However, you should first of all be sure of what you are dealing with IMO.

22/3/18

Martina Stuart

Did you see or hear the news today that most of the returned given for lower back pain in humans are a waste of time and money. I get the impressionthat the same can be said of many of the treatments we provide for dogs with chronic arthritis. The big difference of course is that we humans can tell the doc where it hurts and no vets speak dog! So it is important to make a diagnosis. Or more accurately in practice exclude some specific conditions that may require complete rest specific medical treatment or surgery. I the good old days before mri scans etc this meant careful restriction of but regular controlled exercise and time.
So I suggest that that is the first approach. Maybe reducecge fallout intake excercise on lead only provide a joint supplement ( chondroitin and glucosamine) minimal non steroidal if absolutely necessary and at least 3 short works on the lead daily. If she deteriorates then get the x-rays done.

22/3/18

Martina Stuart

Ps thank you Chicco. I like the hydrotherapy idea

23/3/18

Meg

Thank you both so much.

Chicco - I am interested in natural management if at all possible and will investigate your suggestions. I had read about hydrotherapy and will inquire about that locally. Mind you, she adores water and will need calming down!

Martina - yes I read that article and agree regarding exercise. Chiropractic worked for my back pain too. Jessie showed no discomfort when the vet manipulated her joints and back, so it was difficult to tell what was going on. I forgot to say that we are trying to get her weight down slightly - especially with her reduced exercise.

Is there are recommended glucosamine/chondroitin supplement - there is a bewildering array available?

23/3/18

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